Fer­nand LÉGER was born in Argen­tan (Nor­mandy) in 1881. From 1897 to 1899 he com­plet­ed an appren­tice­ship with an archi­tect in Caen. In 1900 he went to Paris and worked for an archi­tec­tur­al drafts­man. After his mil­i­tary ser­vice, Léger stud­ied at the École nationale supérieure des Arts Déco­rat­ifs and at the Académie Julian. Léger worked in var­i­ous art gen­res, includ­ing paint­ing, film, illus­tra­tion, glass, ceram­ics and design. In 1912 Léger’s works can be seen for the first time in the Kah­n­weil­er Gallery in Paris. In 1924 he opened the Académie de l’Art Mod­erne, a stu­dio that he shared with the French cubist Amédée Ozen­fant. Léger’s ear­ly work, cre­at­ed in Paris, was influ­enced by impres­sion­ism and, from 1909, by cubism. In addi­tion to Picas­so and Braque, Léger found new ways to depict three-dimen­sion­al forms on a flat sur­face. He used geo­met­ric shapes such as cylin­ders, cube and cones and devel­oped his own cubist style. After the First World War, Léger began the Péri­ode mecanique in which he paint­ed tech­ni­cal objects such as screws and crank­shafts. These ele­ments reflect both the war machine of the First World War and the urban indus­tri­al land­scape. After 1918 the series of pic­tures on the world of the big city was cre­at­ed. In 1925 he designed murals for the Pavil­lon de l’E­sprit Nou­veau, the build­ing designed by the archi­tect Le Cor­busier for the Paris World Exhi­bi­tion of Applied Arts and Indus­tri­al Design. In 1931 Léger trav­eled to the USA for the first time. From 1940 to 1945 he lived in exile in New York and taught at Yale Uni­ver­si­ty in New Haven. In 1945 he returned to France. The Musée Fer­nand Léger is opened in Biot (F) in 1960. Fer­nand Léger died on August 17, 1955 in his stu­dio in Gif-sur-Yvette near Paris.

Fer­nand LÉGER was born in Argen­tan (Nor­mandy) in 1881. From 1897 to 1899 he com­plet­ed an appren­tice­ship with an archi­tect in Caen. In 1900 he went to Paris and worked for an archi­tec­tur­al drafts­man. After his mil­i­tary ser­vice, Léger stud­ied at the École nationale supérieure des Arts Déco­rat­ifs and at the Académie Julian. Léger worked in var­i­ous art gen­res, includ­ing paint­ing, film, illus­tra­tion, glass, ceram­ics and design. In 1912 Léger’s works can be seen for the first time in the Kah­n­weil­er Gallery in Paris. In 1924 he opened the Académie de l’Art Mod­erne, a stu­dio that he shared with the French cubist Amédée Ozen­fant. Léger’s ear­ly work, cre­at­ed in Paris, was influ­enced by impres­sion­ism and, from 1909, by cubism. In addi­tion to Picas­so and Braque, Léger found new ways to depict three-dimen­sion­al forms on a flat sur­face. He used geo­met­ric shapes such as cylin­ders, cube and cones and devel­oped his own cubist style. After the First World War, Léger began the Péri­ode mecanique in which he paint­ed tech­ni­cal objects such as screws and crank­shafts. These ele­ments reflect both the war machine of the First World War and the urban indus­tri­al land­scape. After 1918 the series of pic­tures on the world of the big city was cre­at­ed. In 1925 he designed murals for the Pavil­lon de l’E­sprit Nou­veau, the build­ing designed by the archi­tect Le Cor­busier for the Paris World Exhi­bi­tion of Applied Arts and Indus­tri­al Design. In 1931 Léger trav­eled to the USA for the first time. From 1940 to 1945 he lived in exile in New York and taught at Yale Uni­ver­si­ty in New Haven. In 1945 he returned to France. The Musée Fer­nand Léger is opened in Biot (F) in 1960. Fer­nand Léger died on August 17, 1955 in his stu­dio in Gif-sur-Yvette near Paris.


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